Anti-nuclear movement in the United States


Women Strike for Peace during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

“The anti-nuclear movement in the United States consists of more than 80 anti-nuclear groups that oppose nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and/or uranium mining. These have included the Abalone Alliance, Clamshell Alliance, Committee for Nuclear Responsibility, Nevada Desert Experience, Nuclear Information and Resource Service, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Plowshares Movement, Women Strike for Peace, and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. The anti-nuclear movement has delayed construction or halted commitments to build some new nuclear plants, and has pressured the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to enforce and strengthen the safety regulations for nuclear power plants. … On November 1, 1961, at the height of the Cold War, about 50,000 women brought together by Women Strike for Peace marched in 60 cities in the United States to demonstrate against nuclear weapons. It was the largest national women’s peace protest of the 20th century.  The nuclear debate initially was about nuclear weapons policy, and began within the scientific community. Scientific concern about the adverse health effects arising from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing first emerged in 1954. Professional associations such as the Federation of Atomic Scientists and the Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs were involved. The National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy was formed in November 1957, and surveys showed rising public uneasiness about the nuclear arms race—especially atmospheric nuclear weapons tests that sent radioactive fallout around the globe. In 1962, Linus Pauling won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to stop the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, and the ‘Ban the Bomb’ movement spread throughout the United States. … On November 1, 1961, at the height of the Cold War, about 50,000 women brought together by Women Strike for Peace marched in 60 cities in the United States to demonstrate against nuclear weapons. It was the largest national women’s peace protest of the 20th century. There were many anti-nuclear protests in the United States which captured national public attention during the 1970s and 1980s. …”
Wikipedia
W – Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament
W – Helen Caldicott, W – Barry Commoner, W – Bella Abzug, W – Jane Fonda, W – Katha Pollitt, W – Ralph Nader, W – Linus Pauling, W – Karen Silkwood, W – Bertrand Russell, W – Peggy Duff
Was the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament a moderate campaign group or a ‘new’ social movement?


Bertrand Russell (centre), alongside his wife Edith and Ralph Schoenman with Michael Randle (second left), leading an anti-nuclear march in London, 18 February 1961.

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
This entry was posted in Environmental, Feminist, No Nukes, Pacifist, Peace talks, Religion and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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