Category Archives: Paris

Read It and Weep: Margaret Atwood on the Intimidating, Haunting Intellect of Simone de Beauvoir

“How exciting to learn that Simone de Beauvoir, grandmother of second-wave feminism, had written a novel that had never been published! In French it was called Les inséparables and was said by the journal Les libraires to be a story … Continue reading

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RIP Jean-Paul Belmondo: The Actor Who Went from the French New Wave to Action Superstardom

Mr. Belmondo in “Breathless.” His on-screen mannerisms became global signposts of rebellion. “For quite a stretch, the late Jean-Paul Belmondo was France’s biggest movie star. He also, in what now looks like the greater achievement, stubbornly remained the most French … Continue reading

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The Pursuit of Freedom: The New Wave, Jazz and Modernism

Jeanne Moreau and Miles Davis “In the late 1950s and early 1960s, cinema and jazz were at the forefront of an artistic revolution – one of improvisation, immediacy and invention. Both were born around the turn of the century, came … Continue reading

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Jean-Luc Godard – Band of Outsiders (1964)

“Blame it on the Madison. Or blame it on Arthur, Franz, and Odile’s gleeful race through the Louvre in an attempt to break the world record (held by an American, of course) for the quickest visit ever. Blame it on … Continue reading

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Deconstruction

“Deconstruction is an approach to understanding the relationship between text and meaning. It was originated by the philosopher Jacques Derrida (1930–2004), who defined the term variously throughout his career. In its simplest form it can be regarded as a criticism … Continue reading

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A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments – Roland Barthes (1977)

“In the slim volume of A Lover’s Discourse, French philosopher and literary critic Roland Barthes attempts to deconstruct one of the most powerful of human experiences: that of falling in love. Barthes claims that modern society lacks a language with … Continue reading

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The Little Theatre of Jean Renoir (1970)

By Vincent Canby: “‘Le Petit Theatre’ is as much a cause for celebration as an act of It, by one of the greatest of all film directors, who will mark his 80th birthday this September. It is precise, witty, and … Continue reading

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The Long Walk of the Situationist International by Greil Marcus

“I first became intrigued with the Situ­ationist International in 1979, when I strug­gled through ‘Le Bruit et la Fureur,’ one of the anonymous lead articles in the first issue of the journal Internationale Situationniste. The writer reviewed the exploits of … Continue reading

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Double Exposure: Jean-Pierre Melville

“Call him Melville. He picks his way through the rubble, skirts along charred walls, climbs over a roof beam here, steps on a windowpane there, bits of glass scraping underfoot like the screak of winter snow. He moves through interconnecting … Continue reading

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The Day of the Jackal – Frederick Forsyth (1971)

“The Day of the Jackal (1971) is a thriller novel by English author Frederick Forsyth about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French dissident paramilitary organisation, to kill Charles de Gaulle, the President of France. The … Continue reading

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