Isaac Asimov


Isaac Asimov (/ˈæzɪmɒv/; c.  January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. Asimov wrote hard science fiction. Along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, Asimov was considered one of the ‘Big Three’ science fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov’s most famous work is the ‘Foundation’ series, the first three books of which won the one-time Hugo Award for ‘Best All-Time Series’ in 1966. His other major series are the ‘Galactic Empire’ series and the Robot series. The Galactic Empire novels are set in earlier history of the same fictional universe as the Foundation series. Later, with Foundation and Earth (1986), he linked this distant future to the Robot stories, creating a unified ‘future history‘ for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He also wrote hundreds of short stories, including the social science fiction novelette ‘Nightfall‘, which in 1964 was voted the best short science fiction story of all time by the Science Fiction Writers of America. … Examples include Guide to Science, the three-volume set Understanding Physics, and Asimov’s Chronology of Science and Discovery. He wrote on numerous other scientific and non-scientific topics, such as chemistry, astronomy, mathematics, history, biblical exegesis, and literary criticism. … Asimov became a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party during the New Deal, and thereafter remained a political liberal. He was a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War in the 1960s and in a television interview during the early 1970s he publicly endorsed George McGovern. He was unhappy about what he considered an ‘irrationalist’ viewpoint taken by many radical political activists from the late 1960s and onwards. In his second volume of autobiography, In Joy Still Felt, Asimov recalled meeting the counterculture figure Abbie Hoffman. Asimov’s impression was that the 1960s’ counterculture heroes had ridden an emotional wave which, in the end, left them stranded in a ‘no-man’s land of the spirit’ from which he wondered if they would ever return. Asimov vehemently opposed Richard Nixon, considering him ‘a crook and a liar’. He closely followed Watergate, and was pleased when the president was forced to resign. …”
Wikipedia
The Atlantic: Isaac Asimov’s Throwback Vision of the Future
Asimov Online
15 Fascinating Facts About Isaac Asimov
YouTube: World of Ideas

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