Pop art


Oh, Jeff…I Love You, Too…But… – Roy Lichtenstein (1964)

“Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid- to late-1950s. The movement presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular and mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane mass-produced cultural objects. One of its aims is to use images of popular (as opposed to elitist) culture in art, emphasizing the banal or kitschy elements of any culture, most often through the use of irony. It is also associated with the artists’ use of mechanical means of reproduction or rendering techniques. In pop art, material is sometimes visually removed from its known context, isolated, or combined with unrelated material. Among the early artists that shaped the pop art movement were Eduardo Paolozzi and Richard Hamilton in Britain, and Larry Rivers, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns among others in the United States. Pop art is widely interpreted as a reaction to the then-dominant ideas of abstract expressionism, as well as an expansion of those ideas. Due to its utilization of found objects and images, it is similar to Dada. Pop art and minimalism are considered to be art movements that precede postmodern art, or are some of the earliest examples of postmodern art themselves. Pop art often takes imagery that is currently in use in advertising. Product labeling and logos figure prominently in the imagery chosen by pop artists, seen in the labels of Campbell’s Soup Cans, by Andy Warhol. Even the labeling on the outside of a shipping box containing food items for retail has been used as subject matter in pop art, as demonstrated by Warhol’s Campbell’s Tomato Juice Box, 1964 (pictured). The origins of pop art in North America developed differently from Great Britain. In the United States, pop art was a response by artists; it marked a return to hard-edged composition and representational art. They used impersonal, mundane reality, irony, and parody to ‘defuse’ the personal symbolism and ‘painterly looseness’ of abstract expressionism. In the U.S., some artwork by Larry Rivers, Alex Katz and Man Ray anticipated pop art. …”
Wikipedia
10 Famous Pop Art Artists You Should Know
Tate
YouTube: What is Pop Art? Art Movements & Styles


The Cheddar Cheese canvas from Andy Warhol‘s Campbell’s Soup Cans, 1962.

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
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1 Response to Pop art

  1. Summer says:

    Hi! I know you wrote this post some time ago but I just discovered your site and I really enjoy it! I’m curious to know if you like American Pop artists or British ones the best or at least who your favorite pop artist is. I blog exclusively about 1960s art (because I don’t know many others who enjoy it as much as I do) so I’m very excited when I find someone else who wants to talk about it!

    Like

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