Feminism in culture


“Feminism has affected culture in many ways, and has famously been theorised in relation to culture by Angela McRobbie, Laura Mulvey and others. Timothy Laurie and Jessica Kean have argued that ‘one of [feminism’s] most important innovations has been to seriously examine the ways women receive popular culture, given that so much pop culture is made by and for men.’ This is reflected in a variety of forms, including literature, music, film and other screen cultures. Women’s writing came to exist as a separate category of scholarly interest relatively recently. In the West, second-wave feminism prompted a general reevaluation of women’s historical contributions, and various academic sub-disciplines, such as Women’s history (or herstory) and women’s writing (including in English) (a list is available), developed in response to the belief that women’s lives and contributions have been underrepresented as areas of scholarly interest. Virginia Blain et al. characterize the growth in interest since 1970 in women’s writing as ‘powerful’. Much of this early period of feminist literary scholarship was given over to the rediscovery and reclamation of texts written by women. … In the 1960s, the genre of science fiction combined its sensationalism with political and technological critiques of society to produce feminist science fiction. With the advent of feminism, questioning women’s roles became fair game to this ‘subversive, mind expanding genre’. Two early texts are Ursula K. Le Guin‘s The Left Hand of Darkness (1969) and Joanna RussThe Female Man (1970). They serve to highlight the socially constructed nature of gender roles by creating utopias that do away with gender. Both authors were also pioneers in feminist criticism of science fiction in the 1960s and ’70s, in essays collected in The Language of the Night (Le Guin, 1979) and How To Suppress Women’s Writing (Russ, 1983). …”
Wikipedia
W – Feminist literary criticism
W – Feminist science fiction

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
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