Ingmar Bergman


Jörgen Lindström and Liv Ullmann – “Persona”

Ernst Ingmar Bergman (14 July 1918 – 30 July 2007) was a Swedish director, writer, and producer who worked in film, television, theatre and radio. Considered to be among the most accomplished and influential filmmakers of all time, Bergman’s renowned works include Smiles of a Summer Night (1955), The Seventh Seal (1957), Wild Strawberries (1957), The Silence (1963), Persona (1966), Cries and Whispers (1972), Scenes from a Marriage (1973), and Fanny and Alexander (1982). Bergman directed over sixty films and documentaries for cinematic release and for television, most of which he also wrote. He also directed over 170 plays. From 1953, he forged a powerful creative partnership with his full-time cinematographer Sven Nykvist. Among his company of actors were Harriet and Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Gunnar Björnstrand, Erland Josephson, Ingrid Thulin and Max von Sydow. Most of his films were set in Sweden, and numerous films from Through a Glass Darkly (1961) onward were filmed on the island of Fårö. His work often deals with death, illness, faith, betrayal, bleakness and insanity. Philip French referred to Bergman as ‘one of the greatest artists of the 20th century […] he found in literature and the performing arts a way of both recreating and questioning the human condition.’ Mick LaSalle argued, ‘Like Virginia Woolf and James Joyce in literature, Ingmar Bergman strove to capture and illuminate the mystery, ecstasy and fullness of life, by concentrating on individual consciousness and essential moments.’  … In the early 1960s he directed three films that explored the theme of faith and doubt in God, Through a Glass Darkly (1961), Winter Light, (1962), and The Silence (1963). Critics created the notion that the common themes in these three films made them a trilogy or cinematic triptych. Bergman initially responded that he did not plan these three films as a trilogy and that he could not see any common motifs in them, but he later seemed to adopt the notion, with some equivocation. He made a parody of Fellini in 1964, All These Women. In 1966, he directed Persona, a film that he himself considered one of his most important works. While the highly experimental film won few awards, many consider it his masterpiece. Other notable films of the period include The Virgin Spring (1960), Hour of the Wolf (1968), Shame (1968) and The Passion of Anna (1969). …”
Wikipedia
W – Ingmar Bergman filmography
New Yorker: The Immortal World of Ingmar Bergman
senses of cinema
Janus Films – Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema: A Centennial Retrospective
Criterion: Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema
NY Times: Ingmar Bergman, Master Filmmaker, Dies at 89
vimeo: INGMAR BERGMAN RETROSPECTIVE TRAILER

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