The Beatles – White Album (1968)


The Beatles, also known as ‘The White Album’, is the ninth studio album by the English rock band the Beatles, released on 22 November 1968. A double album, its plain white sleeve has no graphics or text other than the band’s name embossed, which was intended as a direct contrast to the vivid cover artwork of the band’s previous LP Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Although no singles were issued from The Beatles in Britain and the United States, the songs ‘Hey Jude‘ and ‘Revolution‘ originated from the same recording sessions and were issued on a single in August 1968. The album’s songs range in style from British blues and ska to tracks influenced by Chuck Berry and by Karlheinz Stockhausen. Most of the songs on the album were written during March and April 1968 at a Transcendental Meditation course in Rishikesh, India. The group returned to EMI‘s Abbey Road Studios in London at the end of May to commence recording sessions that lasted through to mid-October. During these sessions, arguments broke out among the foursome over creative differences. Another divisive element was the constant presence of John Lennon‘s new partner, Yoko Ono, whose attendance in the studio broke with the Beatles’ policy regarding wives and girlfriends not attending recording sessions.  … During the sessions, the band upgraded from 4-track recording to 8-track. As work began, Abbey Road Studios possessed, but had yet to install, an 8-track machine that had supposedly been sitting in a storage room for several months. This was in accordance with EMI’s policy of testing and customising new gear extensively before putting it into use in the studios. … The author Mark Lewisohn reports that the Beatles held their first and only 24-hour session at Abbey Road near the end of the sessions for The Beatles, which occurred during the final mixing and sequencing for the album. This session was attended by Lennon, McCartney and producer George Martin. Unlike most LPs, there was no customary three-second gap between tracks, and the master was edited so that songs segued together, via a straight edit, a crossfade, or an incidental piece of music. …”
Wikipedia
The Beatles – The White Album (Video/Audio)
Rolling Stone: Review: The Beatles’ ‘White Album’
Forbes: A Real Look Behind The Scenes During The Making Of The Beatles’ White Album
amazon
YouTube: Revolution (Live)
YouTube: White Album (full album)

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