Protests of 1968


German student leader Rudi Dutschke

“The protests of 1968 comprised a worldwide escalation of social conflicts, predominantly characterized by popular rebellions against military and bureaucratic elites, who responded with an escalation of political repression. In capitalist countries, these protests marked a turning point for the civil rights movement in the United States, which produced revolutionary movements like the Black Panther Party. In reaction to the Tet Offensive, protests also sparked a broad movement in opposition to the Vietnam War all over the United States and even into London, Paris, Berlin and Rome. Mass socialist movements grew not only in the United States but also in most European countries. The most spectacular manifestation of this were the May 1968 protests in France, in which students linked up with wildcat strikes of up to ten million workers, and for a few days the movement seemed capable of overthrowing the government. In many other capitalist countries, struggles against dictatorships, state repression, and colonization were also marked by protests in 1968, such as the beginning of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, the Tlatelolco massacre in Mexico City, and the escalation of guerrilla warfare against the military dictatorship in Brazil. In the socialist countries there were also protests against lack of freedom of speech and violation of other civil rights by the Communist bureaucratic and military elites. In Central and Eastern Europe there were widespread protests that escalated, particularly in the Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia, in Warsaw in Poland and in Yugoslavia. … The Eastern Bloc had already seen several mass protests in the decades following World War II, including the Hungarian Revolution, the uprising in East Germany and several labour strikes in Poland, especially important ones in Poznań in 1956. The feminist movement made a generation question their belief that the family was more important than the individual. The peace movement made them question and distrust authority even more than they had already. By the time they started college, many were part of the anti-establishment culture and became the impetus for a wave of rebellion that started on college campuses and swept the world. Waves of social movements throughout the 1960s began to shape the values of the generation that were college students during 1968. …”
Wikipedia
1968: A time for dreams and protests
Guardian: My part in the anti-war demo that changed protest for ever (Video)
Why did students and workers protest in 1968?
NY Times – Paris, May 1968: The revolution that never was
1968 – a European movement?


Helsinki demonstration against the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
This entry was posted in Berlin Wall, Black Power, Civil Rights Mov., Counterculture, Cuban Revolution, Feminist, Pacifist, Vietnam War and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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