Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.


Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (November 29, 1908 – April 4, 1972) was a Baptist pastor and an American politician, who represented Harlem, New York City, in the United States House of Representatives (1945–71). He was the first person of African-American descent to be elected from New York to Congress. Oscar Stanton De Priest of Illinois was the first black person to be elected to Congress in the 20th century; Powell was the fourth. Re-elected for nearly three decades, Powell became a powerful national politician of the Democratic Party, and served as a national spokesman on civil rights and social issues. He also urged United States presidents to support emerging nations in Africa and Asia as they gained independence after colonialism. In 1961, after 16 years in the House, Powell became chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, the most powerful position held by an African American in Congress. As Chairman, he supported the passage of important social and civil rights legislation under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Following allegations of corruption, in 1967 Powell was excluded from his seat by Democratic Representatives-elect of the 90th Congress, but he was re-elected and regained the seat in the 1969 United States Supreme Court ruling in Powell v. McCormack. He lost his seat in 1970 to Charles Rangel and retired from electoral politics. … In 1961, after 15 years in Congress, Powell advanced to chairman of the powerful House Education and Labor Committee. In this position, he presided over federal social programs for minimum wage and Medicaid (established later under Johnson); he expanded the minimum wage to include retail workers; and worked for equal pay for women; he supported education and training for the deaf, nursing education, and vocational training; he led legislation for standards for wages and work hours; as well as for aid for elementary and secondary education, and school libraries. Powell’s committee proved extremely effective in enacting major parts of President Kennedy’sNew Frontier‘ and President Johnson’sGreat Society‘ social programs and the War on Poverty. It successfully reported to Congress ’49 pieces of bedrock legislation’, as President Johnson put it in an May 18, 1966, letter congratulating Powell on the fifth anniversary of his chairmanship. …”
Wikipedia
The Rise of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
YouTube: WHAT’S IN YOUR HAND–Classic Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., BLACK IN TIME: A Moment In OUR History – Adam Clayton Powell , Jr., “A New Breed of Cats” (1968), Keep the Faith Baby – Adam Clayton Powell movie 1:46:30

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This entry was posted in Harlem, John Kennedy, Lyn. Johnson, Movie, Poverty, Religion and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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