Gonzo journalism


“Gonzo journalism is a style of journalism that is written without claims of objectivity, often including the reporter as part of the story via a first-person narrative. The word ‘gonzo’ is believed to have been first used in 1970 to describe an article by Hunter S. Thompson, who later popularized the style. It is an energetic first-person participatory writing style in which the author is a protagonist, and it draws its power from a combination of social critique and self-satire. It has since been applied to other subjective artistic endeavors. Gonzo journalism involves an approach to accuracy that concerns the reporting of personal experiences and emotions, in contrast to traditional journalism, which favors a detached style and relies on facts or quotations that can be verified by third parties. Gonzo journalism disregards the strictly-edited product favored by newspaper media and strives for a more personal approach; the personality of a piece is as important as the event or actual subject of the piece. Use of sarcasm, humor, exaggeration, and profanity is common. Thompson, who was among the forefathers of the new journalism movement, said in the February 15, 1973 issue of Rolling Stone, ‘If I’d written the truth I knew for the past ten years, about 600 people—including me—would be rotting in prison cells from Rio to Seattle today. Absolute truth is a very rare and dangerous commodity in the context of professional journalism.’ …”
Wikipedia
Open Culture – How Hunter S. Thompson Gave Birth to Gonzo Journalism: Short Film Revisits Thompson’s Seminal 1970 Piece on the Kentucky Derby (Video)
The Atlantic – Before Gonzo: Hunter S. Thompson’s Early, Underrated Journalism Career
Guardian: Why gonzo journalism is crucial to our understanding of cities and their tribes

The “Gonzo fist”, characterized by two thumbs and four fingers holding a peyote button, was originally used in Hunter S. Thompson’s 1970 campaign for sheriff of Aspen, Colorado.

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
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