Watts riots


Armed National Guardsmen march toward smoke on the horizon during the street fires of the Watts Riots in Los Angeles. After six days of unrest, over a thousand people had been injured — and 34 had died.  (NPR)
“The Watts riots, sometimes referred to as the Watts Rebellion, took place in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles from August 11 to 16, 1965. On August 11, 1965, an African-American motorist was arrested for suspicion of drunk driving. A minor roadside argument broke out, and then escalated into a fight. The community reacted in outrage to allegations of police brutality that soon spread, and six days of looting and arson followed. Los Angeles police needed the support of nearly 4,000 members of the California Army National Guard to quell the riots, which resulted in 34 deaths and over $40 million in property damage. … After a night of increasing unrest, police and local black community leaders held a community meeting on Thursday, August 12, to discuss an action plan and to urge calm. The meeting failed. Later that day, Los Angeles police chief William H. Parker called for the assistance of the California Army National Guard. Chief Parker believed the riots resembled an insurgency, compared it to fighting the Viet Cong, and decreed a ‘paramilitary’ response to the disorder. Governor Pat Brown declared that law enforcement was confronting ‘guerillas fighting with gangsters’. The rioting intensified, and on Friday, August 13, about 2,300 National Guardsmen joined the police in trying to maintain order on the streets. …”
Wikipedia
LA Times: The soundtrack to Watts, then and now (Video)
NPR: Out Of Long-Gone Rubble Of The Watts Riots, Scars And Signs Of Healing (Audio)
LA Times: Archival television footage of the 1965 Watts Riots (Video)
YouTube: Watts Riots Los Angeles CA 1965 HD Historic Footage

About 1960s: Days of Rage

Bill Davis - 1960s: Days of Rage
This entry was posted in Huey P. Newton, Lyn. Johnson, MLKJr., Race Riots and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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