The Fugs First Album (1965)


“A loping, ridiculous, and scabrous release, the Fugs’ debut mashed everything from folk and beat poetry to rock and rhythm & blues — all with a casual disregard for sounding note perfect, though not without definite goals in mind. Actually compiled from two separate sessions originally done for Folkways Records, and with slightly different lineups as a result, it’s a short but utterly worthy release that pushed any number of 1964-era buttons at once (and could still tick off plenty of people). Sanders produced the sessions in collaboration with the legendary Harry Smith, who was able to sneak the collective onto Folkways’ accounts by describing them as a ‘jug band,’ and it’s not a far-off description. A number of songs sound like calm-enough folk-boom fare, at least on casual listening, though often with odd extra touches like weirdly muffled drums or out of nowhere whistles and chimes. …”
allmusic
The Fugs First Album is the 1965 debut album by The Fugs, described in their AllMusic profile as ‘arguably the first underground rock group of all time.’ … The album was originally released in 1965 as The Village Fugs Sing Ballads of Contemporary Protest, Point of Views, and General Dissatisfaction on Folkways Records before the band signed up with ESP-Disk, who released the album under its own label with a new name in 1966. When poet and publisher Ed Sanders established a bookstore next to the apartment of beat poet and publisher Tuli Kupferberg in 1963, the two decided to form a band, The Fugs, writing 50-60 songs between them prior to asking Ken Weaver to join. …”
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YouTube: “First Album” by The Fugs (1966) ESP

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